Tag Archives: breakfast

Here’s Why We All Have To Stop Eating Nutella Because Life Is Full Of Suffering

On today’s episode of “Why Does Everything Have To Hurt So Much?” we’re going to talk all about Nutella and why we can’t have nice things.

Although the marketing team behind Nutella has been peddling the chocolatey, hazelnut-packed spread as being part of a well-balanced breakfast, we all have to remember that these folks are, in fact, part of a marketing team.

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And that means they’ve been lying through their chocolate-covered teeth. As it turns out, there are a few ingredients in Nutella that contributed to a lawsuit against its maker, Ferrero. They’re far from healthy.

Let’s talk about that lawsuit.

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In 2012, Nutella’s parent company paid a total of $3 million to all participants in the claim after being found guilty of something called “healthwashing.”

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This comes into play when marketing teams spin branding on the basis of health and make claims that sound like they’re rooted in scientific fact. In reality, this approach is typically taken when an unhealthy food could potentially be deemed “less unhealthy” than a competitor’s product.

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Over the years, there have even been cases in which healthcare professionals and representatives have teamed up with corporations like Coca-Cola to produce “studies” that tilt findings in the given company’s favor.

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Although the class-action case against Ferrero did not arrive on the coattails of such a study, it operated on a similar basis. Basically, the motion was filed because the brand’s TV ads hocked Nutella as being part of a nutritious breakfast even though it certainly isn’t.

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But what is it about Nutella that’s so bad? Three things: vanillin, soy lecithin, and modified palm oil. I don’t really want to put any of those in my body.

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Let’s start with vanillin because it sounds like the name of a terrible super-villain. The stuff is derived from petroleum, people. We need to go ahead and not ingest it.

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And no, before you ask, it’s not vanilla. In the case of artificial vanilla flavoring, this chemical cocktail is used to fragrance the so-called “extract.” Vanillin is classified as an excitotoxin, and consumption of such toxins has been linked to neurological disorders, migraines, endocrine disorders, seizures, and more.

It also contains MSG, and if you eat Chinese takeout, you know that this stuff triggers the reward center in your brain that makes you want to stuff your face. That’s not good when what you’re eating contains an excitotoxin.

Soy lecithin is also bad news.

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Researchers found that animals that consumed soy lecithin regularly (albeit in fairly high amounts) displayed hypoactivity, poor reflexes, and decreased response to pain medications. Again, this is after much higher exposure to the additive than most of us would get through eating Nutella, but it’s good to monitor intake since it is among the most popular food additives in the world. You’re probably getting hit with this stuff from all sides, folks.

And last but not least, we have modified palm oil.

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By nature, vegetable oils are modified because their production typically requires the use of heavy chemical additives and extreme heat processing. In Nutella, modified palm oil ups the fat factor in a way that isn’t exactly healthy. In peanut butter, which is presumably Nutella’s arch nemesis here in the States, the fat content is pretty high but those fats are naturally occurring.

Basically, they are the “good fats” your doctor always yammers on about. That’s not the case for the oil in Nutella, which is highly processed.

When you spread Nutella on one piece of your morning toast, you might as well melt down a candy bar and spread that on the other. They’d essentially have the same health payoff because life is awful and everything hurts.

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When it comes to crushing your overall contentment, consider me your go-to gal. Goodbye, Nutella. It was nice knowing you.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/nutella-is-bad/

Eating Chocolate For Breakfast Can Help You Lose Weight — 5 Recipes To Try

According to Liz Moskow, culinary director at Sterling-Rice Group, it’s very possible that chocolate cake will become a regular breakfast food because of all the health benefits it offers.

The Denver food expert recently told Food Business News that a Syracuse University study found that dark chocolate improves cognitive functions like abstract reasoning, memory, and the ability to focus — all of which make your workday much easier. Moskow also mentioned another study from Tel Aviv University which found that eating dessert in the morning can even help you lose weight, as our metabolisms are most active during that time of the day.

That said, if your breakfast desserts contain a ton of fat and sugar, you won’t reap any sweet benefits. Don’t worry, though — we’ve got you covered. Here are five deliciously healthy chocolate recipes.

1. There’s no need to give up Nutella when you can make your own healthy homemade version!

2. It’s pretty much impossible not to drool over this amazing chocolate banana bread.

3. Not only are these double chocolate muffins low on calories, but they’re chock-full of protein!

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Read More: Celebrate Cake Decorating Day With These 20 Beautiful Confections

4. If you want an especially decadent breakfast without the guilt, this dark chocolate avocado mousse is the only way to go.

5. And of course, you can have your dark chocolate zucchini cake and eat it in the morning, too!

Get ready for a new revolution, chocolate lovers. We’ll never have to feel shame about starting the day with chocolately goodness ever again!

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/chocolate-for-breakfast/

17 Easy Ways To Make Your Pancakes More Awesome

Breakfast will never be the same.

1. Red Velvet Pancakes

Abigail Wilkins / Via michigan.spoonuniversity.com

Hint: Valentine’s Day. Get the recipe here.

2. Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Pancakes

Leigh Needham / Via cornell.spoonuniversity.com

Time to use the extra can of pumpkin you have lying around. Get the recipe here.

3. Lemon Ricotta Pancakes

Lauren Kaplan / Via cornell.spoonuniversity.com

For when you feel like gettin’ fancé. Fine the recipe here.

4. Pumpkin Protein Pancakes

Malia Hu / Via nu.spoonuniversity.com

Pro tip: Add vanilla whey protein for a flavor and health boost. Get the recipe here.

5. Vegan Oreo Pancakes

Abigail Wang / Via pitt.spoonuniversity.com

Nothing like Oreos for breakfast. Get the recipe here.

6. Funfetti Pancakes

Celeste Holben / Via michigan.spoonuniversity.com

Birthday cake remix pancakes. Sprinkles included. Get the recipe here.

7. Spelt Flour Pancakes

Malia Hu / Via nu.spoonuniversity.com

Guilt-free stack of pancakes. Get the recipe here.

8. Chai Pancakes

Alex Furuya / Via nu.spoonuniversity.com

Zen out with these chai tea pancakes. Get the recipe here.

9. Apple Dutch Baby Pancake

Amanda Shulman / Via upenn.spoonuniversity.com

Oh, baby. Get the recipe here.

10. Tofu Pancakes

Kelda Baljon / Via nu.spoonuniversity.com

You only need three ingredients for these, and they’re perfect for heading in a savory (read: bacon and eggs) direction. Get the recipe here.

11. Gluten-Free Rice Flour Pancakes

Nancy Chen / Via spoonuniversity.com

These light, fluffy pancakes will please your GF BFFs. Get the recipe here.

12. Spiced Banana Pancakes

Hannah Morse / Via upenn.spoonuniversity.com

The perfect Sunday morning banana pancakes. Get the recipe here.

13. Nutella & Reese’s Pancake Sundae

Amanda Shulman / Via upenn.spoonuniversity.com

This combo deserves to be in the history books. Get the recipe here.

14. Banana Oat Peanut Butter Pancakes

Alyssa Maccarrone / Via manhattan.spoonuniversity.com

Your new go-to healthy breakfast. Get the recipe here.

15. Bacon Pancakes

Kelda Baljon / Via nu.spoonuniversity.com

Bacon inside, instead of on the side. Get the recipe here.

16. Hot Chocolate Pancakes with Charred Marshmallows

Phoebe Melnick / Via bu.spoonuniversity.com

Arguably better than s’mores by a campfire. Get the recipe here.

17. Chocolate Chip Banana Pancakes

Andrea Kang / Via nu.spoonuniversity.com

Ooey, gooey chocolateyyy. Get the recipe here.

For more, like Spoon University on Facebook and check out their website here.

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Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/spoonuniversity/pancake-recipes

Guess What — Most Of The Stuff We Eat For Breakfast Is Terrible For Empty Stomachs

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but for many people, it’s also the most difficult. Finding time to chow down on something nutritious is almost impossible when you have to get ready for work and get the little ones off to school.

At this point, most of us feel like eating anything at all is an accomplishment. As it turns out, however, some foods that we think are healthy breakfast stapes are actually terrible to eat on an empty stomach.

Even those of us with the sturdiest stomachs can see long-term negative effects on our health by eating the following 10 foods first thing in the morning. But don’t fret! We also have 10 foods that are okay to eat right after getting out of bed. While you might have to trade in a breakfast favorite or two, there are plenty of delicious alternatives.

1. Yogurt and other fermented milk products form hydrochloric acid in an empty stomach. Over time, this can disrupt your gut’s natural bacteria system.

Read More: Here’s Why We All Have To Stop Eating Nutella Because Life Is Full Of Suffering

2. Pastries and donuts are high in yeast, which can irritate the stomach and cause gas. Not to mention they contain a ton of sugar, which brings us to our next point.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/breakfast-food/

This Is What Breakfast Looks Like In 22 Countries Around The World

The best meal of the day. Inspired by these Quora threads.

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1. Eastern China

Flickr: seeminglee / Via Creative Commons

According to Quora user Zhu-Zixin, a typical breakfast in eastern China can include items like dumplings, rice in vegetable soup, fried sponge cake, steamed creamy custard bun, and porridge.

2. Guyana

Quora user Britt Smith explains that a typical breakfast in Guyana is bake and saltfish. Saltfish is whitefish preserved in salt, and bake is bread dough, fried.

3. Iran

Flickr: kamshots Creative Commons

Quora user Soheil Hassas Yeganeh writes that in Iran a typical breakfast consists of sweet black tea, bread, butter, feta cheese, and sometimes fresh fruit and nuts.

4. France

Quora user Sarah-Je notes that a French breakfast includes
tea, coffee, juice, or hot chocolate, with bread and butter or pastries.

“We only eat sweet food, nothing with salt (no meat, no eggs, unlike people from the UK or USA for example)”, she adds.

5. Japan

quora.com / Via Flickr: triplexpresso Creative Commons

According to Quora user Makiko Itoh, Japanese breakfasts fall into two categories: Wafuu (traditional) and youfuu (Western).

A typical Wafuu breakfast has rice, fish, miso soup, sticky soy beans, and nori seaweed. A typical youfuu breakfast has buttered toast, eggs, coffee, and potato salad.

6. Poland

Quora user Anat Penini writes that a traditional Polish breakfast is scrambled eggs topped with kielbasa (a sausage) and potato pancakes.

7. Southern India

Flickr: mynameisharsha / Via Creative Commons

Quora user Jared Zimmerman says that a common South Indian breakfast is idli and sambar, a vegetable stew served with steamed lentil and rice bread. Also popular is dosa, a thin crunchy crepe with a spicy potato filling.

8. Italy

Italian Quora user Eugenio Casagrande writes that a typical breakfast consists of a cup of coffee with milk and a slice of bread.

9. Central India

Flickr: pankaj / Via Creative Commons

According to Quora user Jared Zimmerman, a typical breakfast in central India is uttapam. Uttapam is a thick pancake with vegetables, served with chutney.

10. Colombia

Quora user Daniel Rojas explains that a typical Colombian breakfast depends on the region.

However, a mixture of leftovers from the night before is common, as is soup or cereal.

11. Turkey

Flickr: mulazimoglu Creative Commons

In Turkey, Quora user John Burgess says, breakfast consists of cheese, olives, honey, jam, bread, an omelette, and fruit.

12. Brazil

Brazilian Quora user Larissa Porto notes that Pão de Queijo (bread cheese) is a common breakfast dish served with coffee.

13. The Phillipines

Flickr: sjsharktank Creative Commons

According to Quora user Katherine Cortes, a typical Philippine breakfast consists of bread rolls and coffee. Tapsilog (rice with dried meat and a fried egg) is also common.

14. Nigeria

Quora user Oyinda Kosemani writes that breakfast varies from tribe to tribe, but a typical Yoruba breakfast includes Ogi and Akara (cornmeal and bean cakes) and well as yam and fried eggs, and fried plantain.

15. Venuzuela

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In Venezuela, Quora user Rowan Vasquez writes, a typical breakfast is an arepa, a flat corn cake. Arepas are filled with various things like cheese, ham, chicken, or fish.

He adds: “On weekends, Venezuelans might have a larger breakfast, consisting of black beans, savory shredded beef cooked with vegetables, white cheese, perico (eggs scrambled with vegetables), avocado, and an arepa.”

16. Cambodia

Quora user Sarah Rose Jensen notes that a typical breakfast in Cambodia is Kuy Teav, a rice noodle soup with meat and vegetables.

17. Lebanon

Flickr: kake_pugh / Via Creative Commons

According to Quora user Ehab Dahdouli, a popular breakfast in Lebanon is Manakish, a flatbread flavoured with za’atar and sometimes cheese, served with tomatoes.

18. Indonesia

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In Indonesia, Quora user Aso Saputra, writes that breakfast could be rice and fried fish, or fried rice and a fried egg (Nasi Goreng, above), or chicken porridge.

19. Pakistan

Nihari is a typical breakfast dish in Pakistan, Quora user Ali Abbas explains. It’s a spicy meat curry, served with naan.

He adds, “Halwa Poori: This is considered as a classic “Sunday” breakfast and is very heavy. It generally consists of ‘poori’, halwa (sweet), and a curry (beans or potato). It is very common to see people in large number gathering at famous places for this Sunday morning breakfast. Often queues are formed outside shops an hour before they start serving.”

20. Morocco

Flickr: eryoni Creative Commons

According to Quora user Ahmed Bouchfaa, breakfast in Morocco is generally sweet, featuring bread, honey, olives, and dates, as well as Turkish coffee and mint tea.

21. Israel

Flickr: imnewtryme / Via Creative Commons

Shakshuka is a popular breakfast dish in Israel, according to Quora user Denise Aptekar. It consists of eggs poached in a tomato sauce.

She adds, “The classic Israeli breakfast (in cafes and hotels) comes with cheese, omelette, tuna, olives, bread and butter/jams, salad and spreads.”

22. UK

Flickr: garydenness / Via Creative Commons

A fry-up, whether it’s a full English, full Scottish, or an Ulster fry. For more full English facts, click here.

Bonus! A video of breakfasts around the world.

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/ailbhemalone/breakfasts-around-the-world

Everyone Eats Breakfast, But It Looks Different Around The World.

Ahh breakfast. They say it’s the most important meal of the day, and they’re right. Have you ever tried getting through the day without breakfast? It’s no fun. 

In America we love our breakfasts big and doughy (just think pancakes). Around the world though, different country’s breakfasts reflect their unique cuisine. Just take a look at these 31 breakfasts from around the world. Warning. If you haven’t had breakfast today, this post will make you hungry. So very hungry. 

1.) Cuba.

Looks so good. You’re supposed to dip the bread into the sweetened coffee.

2.) India

I’m so hungry just looking at this.

3.) Australia.

One word for this meal. Vegemite. Aussies love it.

4.) Portugal.

Stuffed croissants and coffee.

5.) Brazil.

Fresh meats, cheeses, and bread to start your day off right.

6.) The Philippines.

Wow. I need some of this.

7.) Italy.

That looks so sweet.

8.) Iran.

Yummy!

9.) Turkey.

Cheese, butter, eggs, spicy meat, and olives make up a traditional Turkish breakfast.

10.) Colombia.

Yummy soft boiled egg.

11.) Germany.

Sausage, cheese, and bread. The best way to start your day. Not to mention the amazing coffee.

12.) Mexico

Start your day off with something spicy.

13.) Poland.

Yes. I’ll take two please.

14.) Argentina.

Matte tea with “facturas,” a croissant variation.

15.) Thailand.

Meat with porridge. Not sure I’d be too keen on this one.

16.) Bolivia

An empanada like dish called “Saltenas.”

17.) England.

A full English breakfast consists of: bacon, eggs, grilled tomato, mushrooms, bread, black pudding and baked beans. And of course a cup of tea.

18.) Egypt.

This dish is called Foul Madamas. It’s made up of fava beans, chickpeas, garlic, and lemon. Plus some hard boiled eggs, tahini sauce, and veggies.

19.) France.

A wonderful selection of croissants and coffee.

20.) Sweden.

Something sweet to start your day.

21.) Japan.

Tofu for breakfast. With soy sauce of course.

22.) China.

Noodles, chicken, and fried vegetables. Very similar to what you’ll find for lunch and dinner.

23.) Morocco.

Delicious crumpet-like breads with different jams, cheese, and butter.

24.) Mongolia.

How does boiled mutton sound for breakfast?

25.) Pakistan.

Here is an unleavened bread called Aloo Paratha. Sometimes it’s stuffed with vegetables, and goes great with butter or some spicy sauce.

26.) Canada.

Perogies with toast and sausages. Yes please.

27.) Estonia.

Cheese on toast. Simple, but delicious.

28.) Venezuela.

Empenadas. It’s what’s for breakfast.

29.) Ghana.

This is waakye. It’s essentially just rice cooked in beans. Looks pretty good though.

30.) Scottland.

Similar to a full English breakfast, and probably just as delicious.

31.) BONUS! America.

A good ole’ American pancake breakfast. Plus bacon.

Via: Imgur

Is your stomach rumbling too? Before you go grab a late breakfast, make sure to share this post on Facebook. 

Read more: http://viralnova.com/breakfast-around-the-world/

I Don’t Care What You Think About My Breakfast

I’ve spent years copying other people’s snacks and, recently, fending off unsolicited diet advice. Now I’m finally figuring out what I actually want to be eating.

Chris Ritter / BuzzFeed

I made oatmeal this morning, and I can’t stop thinking about it. OK, wait, hear me out. It wasn’t even the instant kind. It was old-fashioned. I cooked it in milk, and then added some things I thought would taste good together. And, miraculously, I was right: It was delicious. I realize I have just described the very basic process that is “cooking,” and I realize that oatmeal is not exactly the height of culinary achievement. But you have to understand: I really don’t know how to cook. This is new for me.

You know how people who cook a lot will be like, “Oh, I just threw this together from things I had in my fridge”? I don’t get that. Paralyzed by indifference and my general distaste for doing things I’m not already good at, I have never attempted to explore whatever creative kitchen potential I might have. I’m pretty sure I don’t have much. Only recently, and very cautiously, have I started experimenting with breakfast: my favorite meal, my one shining beacon of hope.

Up until now I have mostly eaten whatever the people nearest me eat. Ever since I first had the opportunity to procure food for myself, I’ve been a food copycat.

On the rare afternoons she didn’t have plans with her boyfriend or her cooler friends, my best friend in middle school invited me over after school to watch movies and make cookies. Her preferred brand was Nestlé Tollhouse — jumbo-sized, break-and-bake chocolate chip with little peanut butter cups mixed in. We deliberately undercooked them and often ate them straight off the pan. I asked my own mom, who has baked what must, by now, be hundreds of thousands of delicious homemade cookies for our family, to put the store-bought kind on her grocery list.

Standing in line in my college cafeteria I watched people assemble their food one step of ahead of me: what they put on sandwiches in which order, and especially what they put in a salad bowl. I didn’t want salad, at all, but I had this vague, growing sense that I should start eating it anyway. Once I watched someone put shredded carrots, cherry tomatoes, hard-boiled eggs and croutons on top of romaine lettuce and douse the whole thing in low-fat ranch dressing. In my head it became a sort of recipe. Salad = lettuce + carrots + cherry tomatoes + eggs + croutons + low-fat ranch. I didn’t put anything else on it because I was afraid I’d only make it taste worse.

These are the two kinds of meal mimicry: the kind you do just because the food looks (and/or tastes) good, and the kind you do because the food matches some idea you’ve formed about what you’re supposed to eat. For a long time I adopted and ate other people’s formulas with guiltless impunity: potato chips and sour cream, peanut butter plus Nutella, sweet cereal with any other kind of sweet cereal. But eventually I realized everybody else had stopped eating like ravenous teenagers, and then the way I copied other people’s eating was no longer by adding things, but by taking them away. This happened somewhat gradually, but I would guess I noticed it around the same time I first heard the words “chia seeds,” which was also around the time I moved to New York.

Never before in my life have I monitored more closely what I eat, or felt like what I eat is more monitored, than I do now, at 28 years old, living in New York. Most women I know have dealt with what we broadly describe as “food issues,” but I hardly gave my body’s width a second thought until I was in my mid-twenties. I was thin, so nobody ever told me to watch what I ate. I am also from the upper Midwest, where “superfoods” and juice cleanses are still fringe interests at best, and where cultural reservedness prevents most non-kin commentary on other people’s plates. Then I moved to New York, and everybody had input. So much input.

Something I’ve had pointed out to me a lot since moving here is that I really like sugar. I’d always thought of my sweet tooth fondly, as a not-that-bad weak spot I shared with my ancestors. (My mom has this story about a time she baked a pie for my dad’s father. When she went to cut it into eight pieces, as is standard, he stopped her: “Six,” he said. “Heaney serving size is one-sixth.”) I’ve since come to struggle with it. In my heart I don’t truly believe it’s wrong to eat sugar, but I’ve started feeling badly about myself when I do. I’ve started eating single pieces of bitter dark chocolate in lieu of other things I used to love much more. I’m told this is better for me.

Heaney Christmas cookie decorating circa 1992.

There was a time in my life when a piece of bread felt like an acceptable, even logical, companion to pasta, but no longer. In line for a catered lunch at work someone told me my plate was “all carbs,” and every time I’ve gotten lunch since I’ve felt like I’m being watched. I used to be good at dismissing comments like these as essentially impersonal projections, not really about me, but after so many “that’s a big piece/that’s a lot of X/how can you eat that”s, I got involved. Other people’s opinions have so infiltrated my own that there remain very few foods I can eat without considering their merits, and, by extension, what they might do to my increasingly suspect body. And that makes me so fucking mad.

This is probably part of the reason I’ve become obsessed with breakfast. Breakfast is the only meal I always eat completely alone. In the early morning, in my tiny apartment’s half-kitchen, before I’ve seen a single other human being, I feel free to decide for myself what is good for me and what I need. I’m a vegetarian, so I like to make sure my breakfast gives me a baseline of protein. I’ve tried various foundations (eggs, toasts, smoothies), but the thing I always come back to eventually is oatmeal.

A few weeks ago, in search of oatmeal inspiration, I found this list of things nutritionists eat for breakfast. All of them are simple, with recognizable ingredients. I was surprised to see that most of them even included some form of carb. I scrolled through until I found one in particular (shout-out to Anne Danahy, MS, RD, LDN) that seemed like a good foundation for something I could make my own: “steel-cut and old-fashioned oats cooked with 1% milk, mixed with fruit, walnuts, and a scoop of plain Greek yogurt.”

So I went to the grocery store and used it as a guideline, removing the things I don’t like (walnuts) and adding others I do. I have eaten it every day since. It’s so good. I keep thinking about it. I’m already excited to have it again tomorrow.

I don’t know if this is a “good” recipe, and I have *already* been informed that mixing granola with oatmeal is “insane.” This oatmeal is healthy, but, depending on whose unsolicited feedback you get, it could probably be a little bit healthier. That’s OK. To quote Jillian Michaels in her Ripped in 30 workout video, which I like to do as much as possible, “It doesn’t have to be perfect. Perfect sucks.”

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed Life

Katie’s Greek Yogurt Oatmeal

Serves 1

I use a kind of granola from Whole Foods called “simple granola with raisins,” mostly for crunch value. The protein powder (for protein) and maple syrup (for a little extra sweetness) are both optional.

INGREDIENTS
⅔ cup low-fat milk
½ cup old-fashioned oats
Salt
½ cup plain Greek yogurt
⅓ scoop (about 1 ½ tablespoons) vanilla protein powder (optional)
Maple syrup
Small handful of plain granola
Handful of unsalted roasted almonds
Handful of fresh blueberries
Ground cinnamon

PREPARATION
In a bowl, mix the protein powder into the Greek yogurt. Heat the milk with a pinch of salt in a saucepan over medium-low heat, just until it’s steaming hot, and then stir in the oats. Cook for five minutes, until the liquid is absorbed and the texture is creamy. Add a splash of water while cooking if the oats start to look dry. Pour the oats over the Greek yogurt, add maple syrup if desired, and mix. Top with granola, almonds, blueberries, and a sprinkle of cinnamon.

Lauren Zaser / BuzzFeed Life

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/katieheaney/can-i-eat